Low-Tech Speech Therapy

Here are some of my go-to (super cheap) activities (when I’m not feeling all creative, Speech Lady Liz- like).
Bags
I get white, paper lunch sacks and the kids decorate their own.  I put cards in the bag that target each child’s articulation goal.  The student rolls the dice and they have to say the word that many times.  Such an easy game that often gets requested by the kids. 
I also use this for my language kids.  I put in verb cards and they have to put the word in a sentence, tell me the past, present, future tense or whatever their particular goal is. 
Wh-dice
This is a good activity to use after a holiday or weekend.  The student draws a picture of what they want to talk about and then depending on level they:
  1. Tell me all about the picture and then we roll the dice and their classmates have to answer the who, what, where, when questions or…
  2. I roll the dice and the student answers the who, what, where, when questions.  I write the answers on the board and then we figure out how to put all the information in 1-2 sentences so it’s cohesive and listeners can understand what they are talking about. 
Dobbers
Each child gets a dobber and a month themed page.  We practice sounds and depending on how many they get, they get to either color in or use the dobber to mark off how many they produced correctly. 
Beans
That’s right, beans.  For this activity you need two cups and a bag of dried beans.  One cup is for “good” sounds and the other is for “not quite there” sounds.  It’s a good activity for those visual learners. 
I hope this post goes to show that one does not need all the fancy, expensive products to facilitate appropriate and successful speech therapy strategies.  That being said, anyone want to donate an IPad to this speech lady? J


6 comments:

  1. I love your "go to" ideas. Low tech is nice for one of those days when you just don't have the energy to get it done.

    ReplyDelete
  2. Thanks Liz!! These are great ideas that I can use since I don't have many supplies or money to buy new ones!!!

    ReplyDelete
  3. Some people are successful with Donors Choose grants! Does your school system have an assistive technology team? Get involved with that and they may even give you an iPad (that's how I got mine!)

    ReplyDelete
  4. Hi. Found your site via Pinterest. THANK YOU! I'm a self-learning mom with 2 of my kids "neuro-diverse," lame insurance, and in a school district that is ridiculously hard to qualify for services. Needless to say I am very grateful I found your blog!!

    ReplyDelete
  5. Hey Liz! You are a girl after my own heart. Some of the best therapy does not involve devices! I love my IPAD that the district bought me, but only use it as reinforcement or for carry over activities

    ReplyDelete
  6. These are very good therapy ideas. I am always looking for different activities for my students.

    ReplyDelete